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Cheaper moles August 29, 2009

Posted by mirl in Uncategorized.
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I had recently read about Piccadilly notebooks while I was browsing the web trying to satisfy my notebook fixation.  They are basically Moleskine notebooks in design, at less than half the price.  (Here is a review from Black Cover, entitled "Proving Moleskine is Just a Style: The Piccadilly Notebook".)  They are available at Borders bookstores.  Today, I dropped by the local Borders and picked up three of them:  Two small (3.5 x 5.5 in.) notebooks and a large (7.25 x 10 in.) one.  The notebooks with blue labels in the photo are ruled, soft-cover notebooks, while the one with a yellow label is a graph, hard-cover notebook.  It also comes in a style with blank pages, but I did not see those on the bookshelf that I was browsing.  A medium size is also available, which is the same size as the medium Moleskine.

When I compared the paper of the Piccadilly to that of my Moleskines, I realized that the Piccadilly paper (acid-free) is thicker.  When I tested my very wet fountain pens on the Piccadilly, the paper did much better than the Moleskine paper, which actually did terribly on the fountain pen test.

Borders is having a sale this weekend, so the small notebooks went for a penny less than $4, while the large notebooks were a penny less than $6.  So my total cost for the three notebooks was less than the price of a medium-sized Moleskine.  Thank goodness.

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Striking gold August 15, 2009

Posted by mirl in poetry, reading.
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I read Alison Flood's recent article about the BBC's current Poetry Season where she was campaigning against Kipling being UK's favorite poet (again).  She reveals that Gerard Manley Hopkins is her favorite poet, and her favorite poem Hopkins's "Spring and Fall".  Naturally, after reading Flood's heartfelt endorsement, I followed the link to the poem.  Reading as a treasure hunt.

MÁRGARÉT, áre you gríeving
Over Goldengrove unleaving?
Leáves, líke the things of man, you
With your fresh thoughts care for, can you?
Áh! ás the heart grows older
It will come to such sights colder
By and by, nor spare a sigh
Though worlds of wanwood leafmeal lie;
And yet you wíll weep and know why.
Now no matter, child, the name:
Sórrow’s spríngs áre the same.
Nor mouth had, no nor mind, expressed
What heart heard of, ghost guessed:
It ís the blight man was born for,
It is Margaret you mourn for.

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Dirty airplane window August 14, 2009

Posted by mirl in thoughts, travel.
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This airplane window was so scratched up and dirty, my camera couldn't auto-focus past it.  Another thing to note about this photo is that prominent brown patch out on the wing which indicates a peeled surface.  It would seem that this aircraft has been in the service long.  So as I was sitting there, on this particular ride, staring at the brown spot, the thought which came to mind while I was also puzzling about the aircraft material that the peeled surface revealed was how much passengers really weighed in the scheme of the airline industry's scale of risks and benefits.  I succeeded in disturbing myself.

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